Metis Machine

Take Control Of Your Web Analytics Using Snowplow With Alexander Dean - Episode 48

Summary

Every business with a website needs some way to keep track of how much traffic they are getting, where it is coming from, and which actions are being taken. The default in most cases is Google Analytics, but this can be limiting when you wish to perform detailed analysis of the captured data. To address this problem, Alex Dean co-founded Snowplow Analytics to build an open source platform that gives you total control of your website traffic data. In this episode he explains how the project and company got started, how the platform is architected, and how you can start using it today to get a clearer view of how your customers are interacting with your web and mobile applications.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • This is your host Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Alexander Dean about Snowplow Analytics

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get involved in the area of data engineering and data management?
  • What is Snowplow Analytics and what problem were you trying to solve when you started the company?
  • What is unique about customer event data from an ingestion and processing perspective?
  • Challenges with properly matching up data between sources
  • Data collection is one of the more difficult aspects of an analytics pipeline because of the potential for inconsistency or incorrect information. How is the collection portion of the Snowplow stack designed and how do you validate the correctness of the data?
    • Cleanliness/accuracy
  • What kinds of metrics should be tracked in an ingestion pipeline and how do you monitor them to ensure that everything is operating properly?
  • Can you describe the overall architecture of the ingest pipeline that Snowplow provides?
    • How has that architecture evolved from when you first started?
    • What would you do differently if you were to start over today?
  • Ensuring appropriate use of enrichment sources
  • What have been some of the biggest challenges encountered while building and evolving Snowplow?
  • What are some of the most interesting uses of your platform that you are aware of?

Keep In Touch

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Keep Your Data And Query It Too Using Chaos Search with Thomas Hazel and Pete Cheslock - Episode 47

Summary

Elasticsearch is a powerful tool for storing and analyzing data, but when using it for logs and other time oriented information it can become problematic to keep all of your history. Chaos Search was started to make it easy for you to keep all of your data and make it usable in S3, so that you can have the best of both worlds. In this episode the CTO, Thomas Hazel, and VP of Product, Pete Cheslock, describe how they have built a platform to let you keep all of your history, save money, and reduce your operational overhead. They also explain some of the types of data that you can use with Chaos Search, how to load it into S3, and when you might want to choose it over Amazon Athena for our serverless data analysis.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $/0 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Pete Cheslock and Thomas Hazel about Chaos Search and their effort to bring historical depth to your Elasticsearch data

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by explaining what you have built at Chaos Search and the problems that you are trying to solve with it?
    • What types of data are you focused on supporting?
    • What are the challenges inherent to scaling an elasticsearch infrastructure to large volumes of log or metric data?
  • Is there any need for an Elasticsearch cluster in addition to Chaos Search?
  • For someone who is using Chaos Search, what mechanisms/formats would they use for loading their data into S3?
  • What are the benefits of implementing the Elasticsearch API on top of your data in S3 as opposed to using systems such as Presto or Drill to interact with the same information via SQL?
  • Given that the S3 API has become a de facto standard for many other object storage platforms, what would be involved in running Chaos Search on data stored outside of AWS?
  • What mechanisms do you use to allow for such drastic space savings of indexed data in S3 versus in an Elasticsearch cluster?
  • What is the system architecture that you have built to allow for querying terabytes of data in S3?
    • What are the biggest contributors to query latency and what have you done to mitigate them?
  • What are the options for access control when running queries against the data stored in S3?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of Chaos Search and access to large amounts of historical log information that you have seen?
  • What are your plans for the future of Chaos Search?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

An Agile Approach To Master Data Management with Mark Marinelli - Episode 46

Summary

With the proliferation of data sources to give a more comprehensive view of the information critical to your business it is even more important to have a canonical view of the entities that you care about. Is customer number 342 in your ERP the same as Bob Smith on Twitter? Using master data management to build a data catalog helps you answer these questions reliably and simplify the process of building your business intelligence reports. In this episode the head of product at Tamr, Mark Marinelli, discusses the challenges of building a master data set, why you should have one, and some of the techniques that modern platforms and systems provide for maintaining it.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Mark Marinelli about data mastering for modern platforms

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by establishing a definition of data mastering that we can work from?
    • How does the master data set get used within the overall analytical and processing systems of an organization?
  • What is the traditional workflow for creating a master data set?
    • What has changed in the current landscape of businesses and technology platforms that makes that approach impractical?
    • What are the steps that an organization can take to evolve toward an agile approach to data mastering?
  • At what scale of company or project does it makes sense to start building a master data set?
  • What are the limitations of using ML/AI to merge data sets?
  • What are the limitations of a golden master data set in practice?
    • Are there particular formats of data or types of entities that pose a greater challenge when creating a canonical format for them?
    • Are there specific problem domains that are more likely to benefit from a master data set?
  • Once a golden master has been established, how are changes to that information handled in practice? (e.g. versioning of the data)
  • What storage mechanisms are typically used for managing a master data set?
    • Are there particular security, auditing, or access concerns that engineers should be considering when managing their golden master that goes beyond the rest of their data infrastructure?
    • How do you manage latency issues when trying to reference the same entities from multiple disparate systems?
  • What have you found to be the most common stumbling blocks for a group that is implementing a master data platform?
    • What suggestions do you have to help prevent such a project from being derailed?
  • What resources do you recommend for someone looking to learn more about the theoretical and practical aspects of data mastering for their organization?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA