Linode

Building A Knowledge Graph From Public Data At Enigma With Chris Groskopf - Episode 50

Summary

There are countless sources of data that are publicly available for use. Unfortunately, combining those sources and making them useful in aggregate is a time consuming and challenging process. The team at Enigma builds a knowledge graph for use in your own data projects. In this episode Chris Groskopf explains the platform they have built to consume large varieties and volumes of public data for constructing a graph for serving to their customers. He discusses the challenges they are facing to scale the platform and engineering processes, as well as the workflow that they have established to enable testing of their ETL jobs. This is a great episode to listen to for ideas on how to organize a data engineering organization.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Chris Groskopf about Enigma and how the are using public data sources to build a knowledge graph

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you give a brief overview of what Enigma has built and what the motivation was for starting the company?
    • How do you define the concept of a knowledge graph?
  • What are the processes involved in constructing a knowledge graph?
  • Can you describe the overall architecture of your data platform and the systems that you use for storing and serving your knowledge graph?
  • What are the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building the knowledge graph that you have encountered?
    • How do you manage the software lifecycle for your ETL code?
    • What kinds of unit, integration, or acceptance tests do you run to ensure that you don’t introduce regressions in your processing logic?
  • What are the current challenges that you are facing in building and scaling your data infrastructure?
    • How does the fact that your data sources are primarily public influence your pipeline design and what challenges does it pose?
    • What techniques are you using to manage accuracy and consistency in the data that you ingest?
  • Can you walk through the lifecycle of the data that you process from acquisition through to delivery to your customers?
  • What are the weak spots in your platform that you are planning to address in upcoming projects?
    • If you were to start from scratch today, what would you have done differently?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of your product that you have seen?
  • What is in store for the future of Enigma?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Take Control Of Your Web Analytics Using Snowplow With Alexander Dean - Episode 48

Summary

Every business with a website needs some way to keep track of how much traffic they are getting, where it is coming from, and which actions are being taken. The default in most cases is Google Analytics, but this can be limiting when you wish to perform detailed analysis of the captured data. To address this problem, Alex Dean co-founded Snowplow Analytics to build an open source platform that gives you total control of your website traffic data. In this episode he explains how the project and company got started, how the platform is architected, and how you can start using it today to get a clearer view of how your customers are interacting with your web and mobile applications.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • This is your host Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Alexander Dean about Snowplow Analytics

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get involved in the area of data engineering and data management?
  • What is Snowplow Analytics and what problem were you trying to solve when you started the company?
  • What is unique about customer event data from an ingestion and processing perspective?
  • Challenges with properly matching up data between sources
  • Data collection is one of the more difficult aspects of an analytics pipeline because of the potential for inconsistency or incorrect information. How is the collection portion of the Snowplow stack designed and how do you validate the correctness of the data?
    • Cleanliness/accuracy
  • What kinds of metrics should be tracked in an ingestion pipeline and how do you monitor them to ensure that everything is operating properly?
  • Can you describe the overall architecture of the ingest pipeline that Snowplow provides?
    • How has that architecture evolved from when you first started?
    • What would you do differently if you were to start over today?
  • Ensuring appropriate use of enrichment sources
  • What have been some of the biggest challenges encountered while building and evolving Snowplow?
  • What are some of the most interesting uses of your platform that you are aware of?

Keep In Touch

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Keep Your Data And Query It Too Using Chaos Search with Thomas Hazel and Pete Cheslock - Episode 47

Summary

Elasticsearch is a powerful tool for storing and analyzing data, but when using it for logs and other time oriented information it can become problematic to keep all of your history. Chaos Search was started to make it easy for you to keep all of your data and make it usable in S3, so that you can have the best of both worlds. In this episode the CTO, Thomas Hazel, and VP of Product, Pete Cheslock, describe how they have built a platform to let you keep all of your history, save money, and reduce your operational overhead. They also explain some of the types of data that you can use with Chaos Search, how to load it into S3, and when you might want to choose it over Amazon Athena for our serverless data analysis.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $/0 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Pete Cheslock and Thomas Hazel about Chaos Search and their effort to bring historical depth to your Elasticsearch data

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by explaining what you have built at Chaos Search and the problems that you are trying to solve with it?
    • What types of data are you focused on supporting?
    • What are the challenges inherent to scaling an elasticsearch infrastructure to large volumes of log or metric data?
  • Is there any need for an Elasticsearch cluster in addition to Chaos Search?
  • For someone who is using Chaos Search, what mechanisms/formats would they use for loading their data into S3?
  • What are the benefits of implementing the Elasticsearch API on top of your data in S3 as opposed to using systems such as Presto or Drill to interact with the same information via SQL?
  • Given that the S3 API has become a de facto standard for many other object storage platforms, what would be involved in running Chaos Search on data stored outside of AWS?
  • What mechanisms do you use to allow for such drastic space savings of indexed data in S3 versus in an Elasticsearch cluster?
  • What is the system architecture that you have built to allow for querying terabytes of data in S3?
    • What are the biggest contributors to query latency and what have you done to mitigate them?
  • What are the options for access control when running queries against the data stored in S3?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of Chaos Search and access to large amounts of historical log information that you have seen?
  • What are your plans for the future of Chaos Search?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

An Agile Approach To Master Data Management with Mark Marinelli - Episode 46

Summary

With the proliferation of data sources to give a more comprehensive view of the information critical to your business it is even more important to have a canonical view of the entities that you care about. Is customer number 342 in your ERP the same as Bob Smith on Twitter? Using master data management to build a data catalog helps you answer these questions reliably and simplify the process of building your business intelligence reports. In this episode the head of product at Tamr, Mark Marinelli, discusses the challenges of building a master data set, why you should have one, and some of the techniques that modern platforms and systems provide for maintaining it.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Mark Marinelli about data mastering for modern platforms

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by establishing a definition of data mastering that we can work from?
    • How does the master data set get used within the overall analytical and processing systems of an organization?
  • What is the traditional workflow for creating a master data set?
    • What has changed in the current landscape of businesses and technology platforms that makes that approach impractical?
    • What are the steps that an organization can take to evolve toward an agile approach to data mastering?
  • At what scale of company or project does it makes sense to start building a master data set?
  • What are the limitations of using ML/AI to merge data sets?
  • What are the limitations of a golden master data set in practice?
    • Are there particular formats of data or types of entities that pose a greater challenge when creating a canonical format for them?
    • Are there specific problem domains that are more likely to benefit from a master data set?
  • Once a golden master has been established, how are changes to that information handled in practice? (e.g. versioning of the data)
  • What storage mechanisms are typically used for managing a master data set?
    • Are there particular security, auditing, or access concerns that engineers should be considering when managing their golden master that goes beyond the rest of their data infrastructure?
    • How do you manage latency issues when trying to reference the same entities from multiple disparate systems?
  • What have you found to be the most common stumbling blocks for a group that is implementing a master data platform?
    • What suggestions do you have to help prevent such a project from being derailed?
  • What resources do you recommend for someone looking to learn more about the theoretical and practical aspects of data mastering for their organization?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Protecting Your Data In Use At Enveil with Ellison Anne Williams - Episode 45

Summary

There are myriad reasons why data should be protected, and just as many ways to enforce it in tranist or at rest. Unfortunately, there is still a weak point where attackers can gain access to your unencrypted information. In this episode Ellison Anny Williams, CEO of Enveil, describes how her company uses homomorphic encryption to ensure that your analytical queries can be executed without ever having to decrypt your data.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ellison Anne Williams about Enveil, a pioneering data security company protecting Data in Use

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data security?
  • Can you start by explaining what your mission is with Enveil and how the company got started?
  • One of the core aspects of your platform is the principal of homomorphic encryption. Can you explain what that is and how you are using it?
    • What are some of the challenges associated with scaling homomorphic encryption?
    • What are some difficulties associated with working on encrypted data sets?
  • Can you describe the underlying architecture for your data platform?
    • How has that architecture evolved from when you first began building it?
  • What are some use cases that are unlocked by having a fully encrypted data platform?
  • For someone using the Enveil platform, what does their workflow look like?
  • A major reason for never decrypting data is to protect it from attackers and unauthorized access. What are some of the remaining attack vectors?
  • What are some aspects of the data being protected that still require additional consideration to prevent leaking information? (e.g. identifying individuals based on geographic data, or purchase patterns)
  • What do you have planned for the future of Enveil?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data security today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Graph Databases In Production At Scale Using DGraph with Manish Jain - Episode 44

Summary

The way that you store your data can have a huge impact on the ways that it can be practically used. For a substantial number of use cases, the optimal format for storing and querying that information is as a graph, however databases architected around that use case have historically been difficult to use at scale or for serving fast, distributed queries. In this episode Manish Jain explains how DGraph is overcoming those limitations, how the project got started, and how you can start using it today. He also discusses the various cases where a graph storage layer is beneficial, and when you would be better off using something else. In addition he talks about the challenges of building a distributed, consistent database and the tradeoffs that were made to make DGraph a reality.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • If you have ever wished that you could use the same tools for versioning and distributing your data that you use for your software then you owe it to yourself to check out what the fine folks at Quilt Data have built. Quilt is an open source platform for building a sane workflow around your data that works for your whole team, including version history, metatdata management, and flexible hosting. Stop by their booth at JupyterCon in New York City on August 22nd through the 24th to say Hi and tell them that the Data Engineering Podcast sent you! After that, keep an eye on the AWS marketplace for a pre-packaged version of Quilt for Teams to deploy into your own environment and stop fighting with your data.
  • Python has quickly become one of the most widely used languages by both data engineers and data scientists, letting everyone on your team understand each other more easily. However, it can be tough learning it when you’re just starting out. Luckily, there’s an easy way to get involved. Written by MIT lecturer Ana Bell and published by Manning Publications, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python is the perfect way to get started working with Python. Ana’s experience
    as a teacher of Python really shines through, as you get hands-on with the language without being drowned in confusing jargon or theory. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step lessons to take on, Get Programming is perfect for people who just want to get stuck in with Python. Get your copy of the book with a special 40% discount for Data Engineering Podcast listeners by going to dataengineeringpodcast.com/get-programming and use the discount code PodInit40!
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Manish Jain about DGraph, a low latency, high throughput, native and distributed graph database.

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What is DGraph and what motivated you to build it?
  • Graph databases and graph algorithms have been part of the computing landscape for decades. What has changed in recent years to allow for the current proliferation of graph oriented storage systems?
    • The graph space is becoming crowded in recent years. How does DGraph compare to the current set of offerings?
  • What are some of the common uses of graph storage systems?
    • What are some potential uses that are often overlooked?
  • There are a few ways that graph structures and properties can be implemented, including the ability to store data in the vertices connecting nodes and the structures that can be contained within the nodes themselves. How is information represented in DGraph and what are the tradeoffs in the approach that you chose?
  • How does the query interface and data storage in DGraph differ from other options?
    • What are your opinions on the graph query languages that have been adopted by other storages systems, such as Gremlin, Cypher, and GSQL?
  • How is DGraph architected and how has that architecture evolved from when it first started?
  • How do you balance the speed and agility of schema on read with the additional application complexity that is required, as opposed to schema on write?
  • In your documentation you contend that DGraph is a viable replacement for RDBMS-oriented primary storage systems. What are the switching costs for someone looking to make that transition?
  • What are the limitations of DGraph in terms of scalability or usability?
  • Where does it fall along the axes of the CAP theorem?
  • For someone who is interested in building on top of DGraph and deploying it to production, what does their workflow and operational overhead look like?
  • What have been the most challenging aspects of building and growing the DGraph project and community?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of DGraph that you are aware of?
  • When is DGraph the wrong choice?
  • What are your plans for the future of DGraph?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Putting Airflow Into Production With James Meickle - Episode 43

Summary

The theory behind how a tool is supposed to work and the realities of putting it into practice are often at odds with each other. Learning the pitfalls and best practices from someone who has gained that knowledge the hard way can save you from wasted time and frustration. In this episode James Meickle discusses his recent experience building a new installation of Airflow. He points out the strengths, design flaws, and areas of improvement for the framework. He also describes the design patterns and workflows that his team has built to allow them to use Airflow as the basis of their data science platform.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing James Meickle about his experiences building a new Airflow installation

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What was your initial project requirement?
    • What tooling did you consider in addition to Airflow?
    • What aspects of the Airflow platform led you to choose it as your implementation target?
  • Can you describe your current deployment architecture?
    • How many engineers are involved in writing tasks for your Airflow installation?
  • What resources were the most helpful while learning about Airflow design patterns?
    • How have you architected your DAGs for deployment and extensibility?
  • What kinds of tests and automation have you put in place to support the ongoing stability of your deployment?
  • What are some of the dead-ends or other pitfalls that you encountered during the course of this project?
  • What aspects of Airflow have you found to be lacking that you would like to see improved?
  • What did you wish someone had told you before you started work on your Airflow installation?
    • If you were to start over would you make the same choice?
    • If Airflow wasn’t available what would be your second choice?
  • What are your next steps for improvements and fixes?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Taking A Tour Of PostgreSQL with Jonathan Katz - Episode 42

Summary

One of the longest running and most popular open source database projects is PostgreSQL. Because of its extensibility and a community focus on stability it has stayed relevant as the ecosystem of development environments and data requirements have changed and evolved over its lifetime. It is difficult to capture any single facet of this database in a single conversation, let alone the entire surface area, but in this episode Jonathan Katz does an admirable job of it. He explains how Postgres started and how it has grown over the years, highlights the fundamental features that make it such a popular choice for application developers, and the ongoing efforts to add the complex features needed by the demanding workloads of today’s data layer. To cap it off he reviews some of the exciting features that the community is working on building into future releases.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jonathan Katz about a high level view of PostgreSQL and the unique capabilities that it offers

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • How did you get involved in the Postgres project?
  • For anyone who hasn’t used it, can you describe what PostgreSQL is?
    • Where did Postgres get started and how has it evolved over the intervening years?
  • What are some of the primary characteristics of Postgres that would lead someone to choose it for a given project?
    • What are some cases where Postgres is the wrong choice?
  • What are some of the common points of confusion for new users of PostGreSQL? (particularly if they have prior database experience)
  • The recent releases of Postgres have had some fairly substantial improvements and new features. How does the community manage to balance stability and reliability against the need to add new capabilities?
  • What are the aspects of Postgres that allow it to remain relevant in the current landscape of rapid evolution at the data layer?
  • Are there any plans to incorporate a distributed transaction layer into the core of the project along the lines of what has been done with Citus or CockroachDB?
  • What is in store for the future of Postgres?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Mobile Data Collection And Analysis Using Ona And Canopy With Peter Lubell-Doughtie - Episode 41

Summary

With the attention being paid to the systems that power large volumes of high velocity data it is easy to forget about the value of data collection at human scales. Ona is a company that is building technologies to support mobile data collection, analysis of the aggregated information, and user-friendly presentations. In this episode CTO Peter Lubell-Doughtie describes the architecture of the platform, the types of environments and use cases where it is being employed, and the value of small data.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Peter Lubell-Doughtie about using Ona for collecting data and processing it with Canopy

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What is Ona and how did the company get started?
    • What are some examples of the types of customers that you work with?
  • What types of data do you support in your collection platform?
  • What are some of the mechanisms that you use to ensure the accuracy of the data that is being collected by users?
  • Does your mobile collection platform allow for anyone to submit data without having to be associated with a given account or organization?
  • What are some of the integration challenges that are unique to the types of data that get collected by mobile field workers?
  • Can you describe the flow of the data from collection through to analysis?
  • To help improve the utility of the data being collected you have started building Canopy. What was the tipping point where it became worth the time and effort to start that project?
    • What are the architectural considerations that you factored in when designing it?
    • What have you found to be the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building an enterprise data warehouse for general users?
  • What are your plans for the future of Ona and Canopy?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA