Graph

Putting Apache Spark Into Action with Jean Georges Perrin - Episode 60

Summary

Apache Spark is a popular and widely used tool for a variety of data oriented projects. With the large array of capabilities, and the complexity of the underlying system, it can be difficult to understand how to get started using it. Jean George Perrin has been so impressed by the versatility of Spark that he is writing a book for data engineers to hit the ground running. In this episode he helps to make sense of what Spark is, how it works, and the various ways that you can use it. He also discusses what you need to know to get it deployed and keep it running in a production environment and how it fits into the overall data ecosystem.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline, or want to test out the projects you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200Gbit private networking, scalable shared block storage, and a 40Gbit public network, you’ve got everything you need to run a fast, reliable, and bullet-proof data platform. If you need global distribution, they’ve got that covered too with world-wide datacenters including new ones in Toronto and Mumbai. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode today to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jean Georges Perrin, author of the upcoming Manning book Spark In Action 2nd Edition, about the ways that Spark is used and how it fits into the data landscape

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by explaining what Spark is?
    • What are some of the main use cases for Spark?
    • What are some of the problems that Spark is uniquely suited to address?
    • Who uses Spark?
  • What are the tools offered to Spark users?
  • How does it compare to some of the other streaming frameworks such as Flink, Kafka, or Storm?
  • For someone building on top of Spark what are the main software design paradigms?
    • How does the design of an application change as you go from a local development environment to a production cluster?
  • Once your application is written, what is involved in deploying it to a production environment?
  • What are some of the most useful strategies that you have seen for improving the efficiency and performance of a processing pipeline?
  • What are some of the edge cases and architectural considerations that engineers should be considering as they begin to scale their deployments?
  • What are some of the common ways that Spark is deployed, in terms of the cluster topology and the supporting technologies?
  • What are the limitations of the Spark programming model?
    • What are the cases where Spark is the wrong choice?
  • What was your motivation for writing a book about Spark?
    • Who is the target audience?
  • What have been some of the most interesting or useful lessons that you have learned in the process of writing a book about Spark?
  • What advice do you have for anyone who is considering or currently using Spark?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Book Discount

  • Use the code poddataeng18 to get 40% off of all of Manning’s products at manning.com

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building A Knowledge Graph From Public Data At Enigma With Chris Groskopf - Episode 50

Summary

There are countless sources of data that are publicly available for use. Unfortunately, combining those sources and making them useful in aggregate is a time consuming and challenging process. The team at Enigma builds a knowledge graph for use in your own data projects. In this episode Chris Groskopf explains the platform they have built to consume large varieties and volumes of public data for constructing a graph for serving to their customers. He discusses the challenges they are facing to scale the platform and engineering processes, as well as the workflow that they have established to enable testing of their ETL jobs. This is a great episode to listen to for ideas on how to organize a data engineering organization.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Chris Groskopf about Enigma and how the are using public data sources to build a knowledge graph

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you give a brief overview of what Enigma has built and what the motivation was for starting the company?
    • How do you define the concept of a knowledge graph?
  • What are the processes involved in constructing a knowledge graph?
  • Can you describe the overall architecture of your data platform and the systems that you use for storing and serving your knowledge graph?
  • What are the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building the knowledge graph that you have encountered?
    • How do you manage the software lifecycle for your ETL code?
    • What kinds of unit, integration, or acceptance tests do you run to ensure that you don’t introduce regressions in your processing logic?
  • What are the current challenges that you are facing in building and scaling your data infrastructure?
    • How does the fact that your data sources are primarily public influence your pipeline design and what challenges does it pose?
    • What techniques are you using to manage accuracy and consistency in the data that you ingest?
  • Can you walk through the lifecycle of the data that you process from acquisition through to delivery to your customers?
  • What are the weak spots in your platform that you are planning to address in upcoming projects?
    • If you were to start from scratch today, what would you have done differently?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of your product that you have seen?
  • What is in store for the future of Enigma?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Brief Conversations From The Open Data Science Conference: Part 2 - Episode 31

Summary

The Open Data Science Conference brings together a variety of data professionals each year in Boston. This week’s episode consists of a pair of brief interviews conducted on-site at the conference. First up you’ll hear from Andy Eschbacher of Carto. He dscribes some of the complexities inherent to working with geospatial data, how they are handling it, and some of the interesting use cases that they enable for their customers. Next is Todd Blaschka, COO of TigerGraph. He explains how graph databases differ from relational engines, where graph algorithms are useful, and how TigerGraph is built to alow for fast and scalable operation.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and last week I attended the Open Data Science Conference in Boston and recorded a few brief interviews on-site. In this second part you will hear from Andy Eschbacher of Carto about the challenges of managing geospatial data, as well as Todd Blaschka of TigerGraph about graph databases and how his company has managed to build a fast and scalable platform for graph storage and traversal.

Interview

Andy Eschbacher From Carto

  • What are the challenges associated with storing geospatial data?
  • What are some of the common misconceptions that people have about working with geospatial data?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

Todd Blaschka From TigerGraph

  • What are graph databases and how do they differ from relational engines?
  • What are some of the common difficulties that people have when deling with graph algorithms?
  • How does data modeling for graph databases differ from relational stores?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA