CRDTs and Distributed Consensus with Christopher Meiklejohn – Episode 14

As we scale our systems to handle larger volumes of data, geographically distributed users, and varied data sources the requirement to distribute the computational resources for managing that information becomes more pronounced. In order to ensure that all of the distributed nodes in our systems agree with each other we need to build mechanisms to properly handle replication of data and conflict resolution. In this episode Christopher Meiklejohn discusses the research he is doing with Conflict-Free Replicated Data Types (CRDTs) and how they fit in with existing methods for sharing and sharding data. He also shares resources for systems that leverage CRDTs, how you can incorporate them into your systems, and when they might not be the right solution. It is a fascinating and informative treatment of a topic that is becoming increasingly relevant in a data driven world.

Citus Data: Distributed PostGreSQL for Big Data with Ozgun Erdogan and Craig Kerstiens – Episode 13

PostGreSQL has become one of the most popular and widely used databases, and for good reason. The level of extensibility that it supports has allowed it to be used in virtually every environment. At Citus Data they have built an extension to support running it in a distributed fashion across large volumes of data with parallelized queries for improved performance. In this episode Ozgun Erdogan, the CTO of Citus, and Craig Kerstiens, Citus Product Manager, discuss how the company got started, the work that they are doing to scale out PostGreSQL, and how you can start using it in your environment.

Data Serialization Formats with Doug Cutting and Julien Le Dem – Episode 8

With the wealth of formats for sending and storing data it can be difficult to determine which one to use. In this episode Doug Cutting, creator of Avro, and Julien Le Dem, creator of Parquet, dig into the different classes of serialization formats, what their strengths are, and how to choose one for your workload. They also discuss the role of Arrow as a mechanism for in-memory data sharing and how hardware evolution will influence the state of the art for data formats.