Data Kitchen

Taking A Tour Of PostgreSQL with Jonathan Katz - Episode 42

Summary

One of the longest running and most popular open source database projects is PostgreSQL. Because of its extensibility and a community focus on stability it has stayed relevant as the ecosystem of development environments and data requirements have changed and evolved over its lifetime. It is difficult to capture any single facet of this database in a single conversation, let alone the entire surface area, but in this episode Jonathan Katz does an admirable job of it. He explains how Postgres started and how it has grown over the years, highlights the fundamental features that make it such a popular choice for application developers, and the ongoing efforts to add the complex features needed by the demanding workloads of today’s data layer. To cap it off he reviews some of the exciting features that the community is working on building into future releases.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jonathan Katz about a high level view of PostgreSQL and the unique capabilities that it offers

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • How did you get involved in the Postgres project?
  • For anyone who hasn’t used it, can you describe what PostgreSQL is?
    • Where did Postgres get started and how has it evolved over the intervening years?
  • What are some of the primary characteristics of Postgres that would lead someone to choose it for a given project?
    • What are some cases where Postgres is the wrong choice?
  • What are some of the common points of confusion for new users of PostGreSQL? (particularly if they have prior database experience)
  • The recent releases of Postgres have had some fairly substantial improvements and new features. How does the community manage to balance stability and reliability against the need to add new capabilities?
  • What are the aspects of Postgres that allow it to remain relevant in the current landscape of rapid evolution at the data layer?
  • Are there any plans to incorporate a distributed transaction layer into the core of the project along the lines of what has been done with Citus or CockroachDB?
  • What is in store for the future of Postgres?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Mobile Data Collection And Analysis Using Ona And Canopy With Peter Lubell-Doughtie - Episode 41

Summary

With the attention being paid to the systems that power large volumes of high velocity data it is easy to forget about the value of data collection at human scales. Ona is a company that is building technologies to support mobile data collection, analysis of the aggregated information, and user-friendly presentations. In this episode CTO Peter Lubell-Doughtie describes the architecture of the platform, the types of environments and use cases where it is being employed, and the value of small data.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Peter Lubell-Doughtie about using Ona for collecting data and processing it with Canopy

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What is Ona and how did the company get started?
    • What are some examples of the types of customers that you work with?
  • What types of data do you support in your collection platform?
  • What are some of the mechanisms that you use to ensure the accuracy of the data that is being collected by users?
  • Does your mobile collection platform allow for anyone to submit data without having to be associated with a given account or organization?
  • What are some of the integration challenges that are unique to the types of data that get collected by mobile field workers?
  • Can you describe the flow of the data from collection through to analysis?
  • To help improve the utility of the data being collected you have started building Canopy. What was the tipping point where it became worth the time and effort to start that project?
    • What are the architectural considerations that you factored in when designing it?
    • What have you found to be the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building an enterprise data warehouse for general users?
  • What are your plans for the future of Ona and Canopy?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Ceph: A Reliable And Scalable Distributed Filesystem with Sage Weil - Episode 40

Summary

When working with large volumes of data that you need to access in parallel across multiple instances you need a distributed filesystem that will scale with your workload. Even better is when that same system provides multiple paradigms for interacting with the underlying storage. Ceph is a highly available, highly scalable, and performant system that has support for object storage, block storage, and native filesystem access. In this episode Sage Weil, the creator and lead maintainer of the project, discusses how it got started, how it works, and how you can start using it on your infrastructure today. He also explains where it fits in the current landscape of distributed storage and the plans for future improvements.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Sage Weil about Ceph, an open source distributed file system that supports block storage, object storage, and a file system interface.

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start with an overview of what Ceph is?
    • What was the motivation for starting the project?
    • What are some of the most common use cases for Ceph?
  • There are a large variety of distributed file systems. How would you characterize Ceph as it compares to other options (e.g. HDFS, GlusterFS, LionFS, SeaweedFS, etc.)?
  • Given that there is no single point of failure, what mechanisms do you use to mitigate the impact of network partitions?
    • What mechanisms are available to ensure data integrity across the cluster?
  • How is Ceph implemented and how has the design evolved over time?
  • What is required to deploy and manage a Ceph cluster?
    • What are the scaling factors for a cluster?
    • What are the limitations?
  • How does Ceph handle mixed write workloads with either a high volume of small files or a smaller volume of larger files?
  • In services such as S3 the data is segregated from block storage options like EBS or EFS. Since Ceph provides all of those interfaces in one project is it possible to use each of those interfaces to the same data objects in a Ceph cluster?
  • In what situations would you advise someone against using Ceph?
  • What are some of the most interested, unexpected, or challenging aspects of working with Ceph and the community?
  • What are some of the plans that you have for the future of Ceph?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building Data Flows In Apache NiFi With Kevin Doran and Andy LoPresto - Episode 39

Summary

Data integration and routing is a constantly evolving problem and one that is fraught with edge cases and complicated requirements. The Apache NiFi project models this problem as a collection of data flows that are created through a self-service graphical interface. This framework provides a flexible platform for building a wide variety of integrations that can be managed and scaled easily to fit your particular needs. In this episode project members Kevin Doran and Andy LoPresto discuss the ways that NiFi can be used, how to start using it in your environment, and plans for future development. They also explained how it fits in the broad landscape of data tools, the interesting and challenging aspects of the project, and how to build new extensions.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Kevin Doran and Andy LoPresto about Apache NiFi

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by explaining what NiFi is?
  • What is the motivation for building a GUI as the primary interface for the tool when the current trend is to represent everything as code?
  • How did you get involved with the project?
    • Where does it sit in the broader landscape of data tools?
  • Does the data that is processed by NiFi flow through the servers that it is running on (á la Spark/Flink/Kafka), or does it orchestrate actions on other systems (á la Airflow/Oozie)?
    • How do you manage versioning and backup of data flows, as well as promoting them between environments?
  • One of the advertised features is tracking provenance for data flows that are managed by NiFi. How is that data collected and managed?
    • What types of reporting are available across this information?
  • What are some of the use cases or requirements that lend themselves well to being solved by NiFi?
    • When is NiFi the wrong choice?
  • What is involved in deploying and scaling a NiFi installation?
    • What are some of the system/network parameters that should be considered?
    • What are the scaling limitations?
  • What have you found to be some of the most interesting, unexpected, and/or challenging aspects of building and maintaining the NiFi project and community?
  • What do you have planned for the future of NiFi?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Leveraging Human Intelligence For Better AI At Alegion With Cheryl Martin - Episode 38

Summary

Data is often messy or incomplete, requiring human intervention to make sense of it before being usable as input to machine learning projects. This is problematic when the volume scales beyond a handful of records. In this episode Dr. Cheryl Martin, Chief Data Scientist for Alegion, discusses the importance of properly labeled information for machine learning and artificial intelligence projects, the systems that they have built to scale the process of incorporating human intelligence in the data preparation process, and the challenges inherent to such an endeavor.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Cheryl Martin, chief data scientist at Alegion, about data labelling at scale

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • To start, can you explain the problem space that Alegion is targeting and how you operate?
  • When is it necessary to include human intelligence as part of the data lifecycle for ML/AI projects?
  • What are some of the biggest challenges associated with managing human input to data sets intended for machine usage?
  • For someone who is acting as human-intelligence provider as part of the workforce, what does their workflow look like?
    • What tools and processes do you have in place to ensure the accuracy of their inputs?
    • How do you prevent bad actors from contributing data that would compromise the trained model?
  • What are the limitations of crowd-sourced data labels?
    • When is it beneficial to incorporate domain experts in the process?
  • When doing data collection from various sources, how do you ensure that intellectual property rights are respected?
  • How do you determine the taxonomies to be used for structuring data sets that are collected, labeled or enriched for your customers?
    • What kinds of metadata do you track and how is that recorded/transmitted?
  • Do you think that human intelligence will be a necessary piece of ML/AI forever?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Package Management And Distribution For Your Data Using Quilt with Kevin Moore - Episode 37

Summary

Collaboration, distribution, and installation of software projects is largely a solved problem, but the same cannot be said of data. Every data team has a bespoke means of sharing data sets, versioning them, tracking related metadata and changes, and publishing them for use in the software systems that rely on them. The CEO and founder of Quilt Data, Kevin Moore, was sufficiently frustrated by this problem to create a platform that attempts to be the means by which data can be as collaborative and easy to work with as GitHub and your favorite programming language. In this episode he explains how the project came to be, how it works, and the many ways that you can start using it today.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Kevin Moore about Quilt Data, a platform and tooling for packaging, distributing, and versioning data

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What is the intended use case for Quilt and how did the project get started?
  • Can you step through a typical workflow of someone using Quilt?
    • How does that change as you go from a single user to a team of data engineers and data scientists?
  • Can you describe the elements of what a data package consists of?
    • What was your criteria for the file formats that you chose?
  • How is Quilt architected and what have been the most significant changes or evolutions since you first started?
  • How is the data registry implemented?
    • What are the limitations or edge cases that you have run into?
    • What optimizations have you made to accelerate synchronization of the data to and from the repository?
  • What are the limitations in terms of data volume, format, or usage?
  • What is your goal with the business that you have built around the project?
  • What are your plans for the future of Quilt?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA