Companies

Keep Your Data And Query It Too Using Chaos Search with Thomas Hazel and Pete Cheslock - Episode 47

Summary

Elasticsearch is a powerful tool for storing and analyzing data, but when using it for logs and other time oriented information it can become problematic to keep all of your history. Chaos Search was started to make it easy for you to keep all of your data and make it usable in S3, so that you can have the best of both worlds. In this episode the CTO, Thomas Hazel, and VP of Product, Pete Cheslock, describe how they have built a platform to let you keep all of your history, save money, and reduce your operational overhead. They also explain some of the types of data that you can use with Chaos Search, how to load it into S3, and when you might want to choose it over Amazon Athena for our serverless data analysis.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $/0 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Pete Cheslock and Thomas Hazel about Chaos Search and their effort to bring historical depth to your Elasticsearch data

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by explaining what you have built at Chaos Search and the problems that you are trying to solve with it?
    • What types of data are you focused on supporting?
    • What are the challenges inherent to scaling an elasticsearch infrastructure to large volumes of log or metric data?
  • Is there any need for an Elasticsearch cluster in addition to Chaos Search?
  • For someone who is using Chaos Search, what mechanisms/formats would they use for loading their data into S3?
  • What are the benefits of implementing the Elasticsearch API on top of your data in S3 as opposed to using systems such as Presto or Drill to interact with the same information via SQL?
  • Given that the S3 API has become a de facto standard for many other object storage platforms, what would be involved in running Chaos Search on data stored outside of AWS?
  • What mechanisms do you use to allow for such drastic space savings of indexed data in S3 versus in an Elasticsearch cluster?
  • What is the system architecture that you have built to allow for querying terabytes of data in S3?
    • What are the biggest contributors to query latency and what have you done to mitigate them?
  • What are the options for access control when running queries against the data stored in S3?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of Chaos Search and access to large amounts of historical log information that you have seen?
  • What are your plans for the future of Chaos Search?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Protecting Your Data In Use At Enveil with Ellison Anne Williams - Episode 45

Summary

There are myriad reasons why data should be protected, and just as many ways to enforce it in tranist or at rest. Unfortunately, there is still a weak point where attackers can gain access to your unencrypted information. In this episode Ellison Anny Williams, CEO of Enveil, describes how her company uses homomorphic encryption to ensure that your analytical queries can be executed without ever having to decrypt your data.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ellison Anne Williams about Enveil, a pioneering data security company protecting Data in Use

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data security?
  • Can you start by explaining what your mission is with Enveil and how the company got started?
  • One of the core aspects of your platform is the principal of homomorphic encryption. Can you explain what that is and how you are using it?
    • What are some of the challenges associated with scaling homomorphic encryption?
    • What are some difficulties associated with working on encrypted data sets?
  • Can you describe the underlying architecture for your data platform?
    • How has that architecture evolved from when you first began building it?
  • What are some use cases that are unlocked by having a fully encrypted data platform?
  • For someone using the Enveil platform, what does their workflow look like?
  • A major reason for never decrypting data is to protect it from attackers and unauthorized access. What are some of the remaining attack vectors?
  • What are some aspects of the data being protected that still require additional consideration to prevent leaking information? (e.g. identifying individuals based on geographic data, or purchase patterns)
  • What do you have planned for the future of Enveil?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data security today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Mobile Data Collection And Analysis Using Ona And Canopy With Peter Lubell-Doughtie - Episode 41

Summary

With the attention being paid to the systems that power large volumes of high velocity data it is easy to forget about the value of data collection at human scales. Ona is a company that is building technologies to support mobile data collection, analysis of the aggregated information, and user-friendly presentations. In this episode CTO Peter Lubell-Doughtie describes the architecture of the platform, the types of environments and use cases where it is being employed, and the value of small data.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Peter Lubell-Doughtie about using Ona for collecting data and processing it with Canopy

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What is Ona and how did the company get started?
    • What are some examples of the types of customers that you work with?
  • What types of data do you support in your collection platform?
  • What are some of the mechanisms that you use to ensure the accuracy of the data that is being collected by users?
  • Does your mobile collection platform allow for anyone to submit data without having to be associated with a given account or organization?
  • What are some of the integration challenges that are unique to the types of data that get collected by mobile field workers?
  • Can you describe the flow of the data from collection through to analysis?
  • To help improve the utility of the data being collected you have started building Canopy. What was the tipping point where it became worth the time and effort to start that project?
    • What are the architectural considerations that you factored in when designing it?
    • What have you found to be the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building an enterprise data warehouse for general users?
  • What are your plans for the future of Ona and Canopy?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Leveraging Human Intelligence For Better AI At Alegion With Cheryl Martin - Episode 38

Summary

Data is often messy or incomplete, requiring human intervention to make sense of it before being usable as input to machine learning projects. This is problematic when the volume scales beyond a handful of records. In this episode Dr. Cheryl Martin, Chief Data Scientist for Alegion, discusses the importance of properly labeled information for machine learning and artificial intelligence projects, the systems that they have built to scale the process of incorporating human intelligence in the data preparation process, and the challenges inherent to such an endeavor.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Cheryl Martin, chief data scientist at Alegion, about data labelling at scale

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • To start, can you explain the problem space that Alegion is targeting and how you operate?
  • When is it necessary to include human intelligence as part of the data lifecycle for ML/AI projects?
  • What are some of the biggest challenges associated with managing human input to data sets intended for machine usage?
  • For someone who is acting as human-intelligence provider as part of the workforce, what does their workflow look like?
    • What tools and processes do you have in place to ensure the accuracy of their inputs?
    • How do you prevent bad actors from contributing data that would compromise the trained model?
  • What are the limitations of crowd-sourced data labels?
    • When is it beneficial to incorporate domain experts in the process?
  • When doing data collection from various sources, how do you ensure that intellectual property rights are respected?
  • How do you determine the taxonomies to be used for structuring data sets that are collected, labeled or enriched for your customers?
    • What kinds of metadata do you track and how is that recorded/transmitted?
  • Do you think that human intelligence will be a necessary piece of ML/AI forever?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Package Management And Distribution For Your Data Using Quilt with Kevin Moore - Episode 37

Summary

Collaboration, distribution, and installation of software projects is largely a solved problem, but the same cannot be said of data. Every data team has a bespoke means of sharing data sets, versioning them, tracking related metadata and changes, and publishing them for use in the software systems that rely on them. The CEO and founder of Quilt Data, Kevin Moore, was sufficiently frustrated by this problem to create a platform that attempts to be the means by which data can be as collaborative and easy to work with as GitHub and your favorite programming language. In this episode he explains how the project came to be, how it works, and the many ways that you can start using it today.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Are you struggling to keep up with customer request and letting errors slip into production? Want to try some of the innovative ideas in this podcast but don’t have time? DataKitchen’s DataOps software allows your team to quickly iterate and deploy pipelines of code, models, and data sets while improving quality. Unlike a patchwork of manual operations, DataKitchen makes your team shine by providing an end to end DataOps solution with minimal programming that uses the tools you love. Join the DataOps movement and sign up for the newsletter at datakitchen.io/de today. After that learn more about why you should be doing DataOps by listening to the Head Chef in the Data Kitchen at dataengineeringpodcast.com/datakitchen
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Kevin Moore about Quilt Data, a platform and tooling for packaging, distributing, and versioning data

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What is the intended use case for Quilt and how did the project get started?
  • Can you step through a typical workflow of someone using Quilt?
    • How does that change as you go from a single user to a team of data engineers and data scientists?
  • Can you describe the elements of what a data package consists of?
    • What was your criteria for the file formats that you chose?
  • How is Quilt architected and what have been the most significant changes or evolutions since you first started?
  • How is the data registry implemented?
    • What are the limitations or edge cases that you have run into?
    • What optimizations have you made to accelerate synchronization of the data to and from the repository?
  • What are the limitations in terms of data volume, format, or usage?
  • What is your goal with the business that you have built around the project?
  • What are your plans for the future of Quilt?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

User Analytics In Depth At Heap with Dan Robinson - Episode 36

Summary

Web and mobile analytics are an important part of any business, and difficult to get right. The most frustrating part is when you realize that you haven’t been tracking a key interaction, having to write custom logic to add that event, and then waiting to collect data. Heap is a platform that automatically tracks every event so that you can retroactively decide which actions are important to your business and easily build reports with or without SQL. In this episode Dan Robinson, CTO of Heap, describes how they have architected their data infrastructure, how they build their tracking agents, and the data virtualization layer that enables users to define their own labels.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • For complete visibility into the health of your pipeline, including deployment tracking, and powerful alerting driven by machine-learning, DataDog has got you covered. With their monitoring, metrics, and log collection agent, including extensive integrations and distributed tracing, you’ll have everything you need to find and fix performance bottlenecks in no time. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/datadog today to start your free 14 day trial and get a sweet new T-Shirt.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Dan Robinson about Heap and their approach to collecting, storing, and analyzing large volumes of data

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by giving a brief overview of Heap?
  • One of your differentiating features is the fact that you capture every interaction on web and mobile platforms for your customers. How do you prevent the user experience from suffering as a result of network congestion, while ensuring the reliable delivery of that data?
  • Can you walk through the lifecycle of a single event from source to destination and the infrastructure components that it traverses to get there?
  • Data collected in a user’s browser can often be messy due to various browser plugins, variations in runtime capabilities, etc. How do you ensure the integrity and accuracy of that information?
    • What are some of the difficulties that you have faced in establishing a representation of events that allows for uniform processing and storage?
  • What is your approach for merging and enriching event data with the information that you retrieve from your supported integrations?
    • What challenges does that pose in your processing architecture?
  • What are some of the problems that you have had to deal with to allow for processing and storing such large volumes of data?
    • How has that architecture changed or evolved over the life of the company?
    • What are some changes that you are anticipating in the near future?
  • Can you describe your approach for synchronizing customer data with their individual Redshift instances and the difficulties that entails?
  • What are some of the most interesting challenges that you have faced while building the technical and business aspects of Heap?
  • What changes have been necessary as a result of GDPR?
  • What are your plans for the future of Heap?

Contact Info

  • @danlovesproofs on twitter
  • [email protected]
  • @drob on github
  • heapanalytics.com / @heap on twitter
  • https://heapanalytics.com/blog/category/engineering

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

CockroachDB In Depth with Peter Mattis - Episode 35

Summary

With the increased ease of gaining access to servers in data centers across the world has come the need for supporting globally distributed data storage. With the first wave of cloud era databases the ability to replicate information geographically came at the expense of transactions and familiar query languages. To address these shortcomings the engineers at Cockroach Labs have built a globally distributed SQL database with full ACID semantics in Cockroach DB. In this episode Peter Mattis, the co-founder and VP of Engineering at Cockroach Labs, describes the architecture that underlies the database, the challenges they have faced along the way, and the ways that you can use it in your own environments today.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • For complete visibility into the health of your pipeline, including deployment tracking, and powerful alerting driven by machine-learning, DataDog has got you covered. With their monitoring, metrics, and log collection agent, including extensive integrations and distributed tracing, you’ll have everything you need to find and fix performance bottlenecks in no time. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/datadog today to start your free 14 day trial and get a sweet new T-Shirt.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Peter Mattis about CockroachDB, the SQL database for global cloud services

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What was the motivation for creating CockroachDB and building a business around it?
  • Can you describe the architecture of CockroachDB and how it supports distributed ACID transactions?
    • What are some of the tradeoffs that are necessary to allow for georeplicated data with distributed transactions?
    • What are some of the problems that you have had to work around in the RAFT protocol to provide reliable operation of the clustering mechanism?
  • Go is an unconventional language for building a database. What are the pros and cons of that choice?
  • What are some of the common points of confusion that users of CockroachDB have when operating or interacting with it?
    • What are the edge cases and failure modes that users should be aware of?
  • I know that your SQL syntax is PostGreSQL compatible, so is it possible to use existing ORMs unmodified with CockroachDB?
    • What are some examples of extensions that are specific to CockroachDB?
  • What are some of the most interesting uses of CockroachDB that you have seen?
  • When is CockroachDB the wrong choice?
  • What do you have planned for the future of CockroachDB?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

ArangoDB: Fast, Scalable, and Multi-Model Data Storage with Jan Steeman and Jan Stücke - Episode 34

Summary

Using a multi-model database in your applications can greatly reduce the amount of infrastructure and complexity required. ArangoDB is a storage engine that supports documents, dey/value, and graph data formats, as well as being fast and scalable. In this episode Jan Steeman and Jan Stücke explain where Arango fits in the crowded database market, how it works under the hood, and how you can start working with it today.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jan Stücke and Jan Steeman about ArangoDB, a multi-model distributed database for graph, document, and key/value storage.

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you give a high level description of what ArangoDB is and the motivation for creating it?
    • What is the story behind the name?
  • How is ArangoDB constructed?
    • How does the underlying engine store the data to allow for the different ways of viewing it?
  • What are some of the benefits of multi-model data storage?
    • When does it become problematic?
  • For users who are accustomed to a relational engine, how do they need to adjust their approach to data modeling when working with Arango?
  • How does it compare to OrientDB?
  • What are the options for scaling a running system?
    • What are the limitations in terms of network architecture or data volumes?
  • One of the unique aspects of ArangoDB is the Foxx framework for embedding microservices in the data layer. What benefits does that provide over a three tier architecture?
    • What mechanisms do you have in place to prevent data breaches from security vulnerabilities in the Foxx code?
    • What are some of the most interesting or surprising uses of this functionality that you have seen?
  • What are some of the most challenging technical and business aspects of building and promoting ArangoDB?
  • What do you have planned for the future of ArangoDB?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

The Alooma Data Pipeline With CTO Yair Weinberger - Episode 33

Summary

Building an ETL pipeline is a common need across businesses and industries. It’s easy to get one started but difficult to manage as new requirements are added and greater scalability becomes necessary. Rather than duplicating the efforts of other engineers it might be best to use a hosted service to handle the plumbing so that you can focus on the parts that actually matter for your business. In this episode CTO and co-founder of Alooma, Yair Weinberger, explains how the platform addresses the common needs of data collection, manipulation, and storage while allowing for flexible processing. He describes the motivation for starting the company, how their infrastructure is architected, and the challenges of supporting multi-tenancy and a wide variety of integrations.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • For complete visibility into the health of your pipeline, including deployment tracking, and powerful alerting driven by machine-learning, DataDog has got you covered. With their monitoring, metrics, and log collection agent, including extensive integrations and distributed tracing, you’ll have everything you need to find and fix performance bottlenecks in no time. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/datadog today to start your free 14 day trial and get a sweet new T-Shirt.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Yair Weinberger about Alooma, a company providing data pipelines as a service

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • What is Alooma and what is the origin story?
  • How is the Alooma platform architected?
    • I want to go into stream VS batch here
    • What are the most challenging components to scale?
  • How do you manage the underlying infrastructure to support your SLA of 5 nines?
  • What are some of the complexities introduced by processing data from multiple customers with various compliance requirements?
    • How do you sandbox user’s processing code to avoid security exploits?
  • What are some of the potential pitfalls for automatic schema management in the target database?
  • Given the large number of integrations, how do you maintain the
    • What are some challenges when creating integrations, isn’t it simply conforming with an external API?
  • For someone getting started with Alooma what does the workflow look like?
  • What are some of the most challenging aspects of building and maintaining Alooma?
  • What are your plans for the future of Alooma?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

PrestoDB and Starburst Data with Kamil Bajda-Pawlikowski - Episode 32

Summary

Most businesses end up with data in a myriad of places with varying levels of structure. This makes it difficult to gain insights from across departments, projects, or people. Presto is a distributed SQL engine that allows you to tie all of your information together without having to first aggregate it all into a data warehouse. Kamil Bajda-Pawlikowski co-founded Starburst Data to provide support and tooling for Presto, as well as contributing advanced features back to the project. In this episode he describes how Presto is architected, how you can use it for your analytics, and the work that he is doing at Starburst Data.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Kamil Bajda-Pawlikowski about Presto and his experiences with supporting it at Starburst Data

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by explaining what Presto is?
    • What are some of the common use cases and deployment patterns for Presto?
  • How does Presto compare to Drill or Impala?
  • What is it about Presto that led you to building a business around it?
  • What are some of the most challenging aspects of running and scaling Presto?
  • For someone who is using the Presto SQL interface, what are some of the considerations that they should keep in mind to avoid writing poorly performing queries?
    • How does Presto represent data for translating between its SQL dialect and the API of the data stores that it interfaces with?
  • What are some cases in which Presto is not the right solution?
  • What types of support have you found to be the most commonly requested?
  • What are some of the types of tooling or improvements that you have made to Presto in your distribution?
    • What are some of the notable changes that your team has contributed upstream to Presto?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / {CC BY-SA](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)