Companies

Customer Analytics At Scale With Segment - Episode 72

Summary

Customer analytics is a problem domain that has given rise to its own industry. In order to gain a full understanding of what your users are doing and how best to serve them you may need to send data to multiple services, each with their own tracking code or APIs. To simplify this process and allow your non-engineering employees to gain access to the information they need to do their jobs Segment provides a single interface for capturing data and routing it to all of the places that you need it. In this interview Segment CTO and co-founder Calvin French-Owen explains how the company got started, how it manages to multiplex data streams from multiple sources to multiple destinations, and how it can simplify your work of gaining visibility into how your customers are engaging with your business.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline, or want to test out the projects you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out our friends at Linode. With 200Gbit private networking, scalable shared block storage, and a 40Gbit public network, you’ve got everything you need to run a fast, reliable, and bullet-proof data platform. If you need global distribution, they’ve got that covered too with world-wide datacenters including new ones in Toronto and Mumbai. And for your machine learning workloads, they just announced dedicated CPU instances. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode today to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Managing and auditing access to your servers and databases is a problem that grows in difficulty alongside the growth of your teams. If you are tired of wasting your time cobbling together scripts and workarounds to give your developers, data scientists, and managers the permissions that they need then it’s time to talk to our friends at strongDM. They have built an easy to use platform that lets you leverage your company’s single sign on for your data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/strongdm today to find out how you can simplify your systems.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in databases, streaming platforms, big data, and everything else you need to know about modern data management. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with O’Reilly Media for the Strata conference in San Francisco on March 25th and the Artificial Intelligence conference in NYC on April 15th. Here in Boston, starting on May 17th, you still have time to grab a ticket to the Enterprise Data World, and from April 30th to May 3rd is the Open Data Science Conference. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Calvin French-Owen about the data platform that Segment has built to handle multiplexing continuous streams of data from multiple sources to multiple destinations

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by explaining what Segment is and how the business got started?
    • What are some of the primary ways that your customers are using the Segment platform?
    • How have the capabilities and use cases of the Segment platform changed since it was first launched?
  • Layered on top of the data integration platform you have added the concepts of Protocols and Personas. Can you explain how each of those products fit into the overall structure of Segment and the driving force behind their design and use?
  • What are some of the best practices for structuring custom events in a way that they can be easily integrated with downstream platforms?
    • How do you manage changes or errors in the events generated by the various sources that you support?
  • How is the Segment platform architected and how has that architecture evolved over the past few years?
  • What are some of the unique challenges that you face as a result of being a many-to-many event routing platform?
  • In addition to the various services that you integrate with for data delivery, you also support populating of data warehouses. What is involved in establishing and maintaining the schema and transformations for a customer?
  • What have been some of the most interesting, unexpected, and/or challenging lessons that you have learned while building and growing the technical and business aspects of Segment?
  • What are some of the features and improvements, both technical and business, that you have planned for the future?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building Enterprise Big Data Systems At LEGO - Episode 66

Summary

Building internal expertise around big data in a large organization is a major competitive advantage. However, it can be a difficult process due to compliance needs and the need to scale globally on day one. In this episode Jesper S√łgaard and Keld Antonsen share the story of starting and growing the big data group at LEGO. They discuss the challenges of being at global scale from the start, hiring and training talented engineers, prototyping and deploying new systems in the cloud, and what they have learned in the process. This is a useful conversation for engineers, managers, and leadership who are interested in building enterprise big data systems.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline, or want to test out the projects you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200Gbit private networking, scalable shared block storage, and a 40Gbit public network, you’ve got everything you need to run a fast, reliable, and bullet-proof data platform. If you need global distribution, they’ve got that covered too with world-wide datacenters including new ones in Toronto and Mumbai. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode today to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Keld Antonsen and Jesper Soegaard about the data infrastructure and analytics that powers LEGO

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • My understanding is that the big data group at LEGO is a fairly recent development. Can you share the story of how it got started?
    • What kinds of data practices were in place prior to starting a dedicated group for managing the organization’s data?
    • What was the transition process like, migrating data silos into a uniformly managed platform?
  • What are the biggest data challenges that you face at LEGO?
  • What are some of the most critical sources and types of data that you are managing?
  • What are the main components of the data infrastructure that you have built to support the organizations analytical needs?
    • What are some of the technologies that you have found to be most useful?
    • Which have been the most problematic?
  • What does the team structure look like for the data services at LEGO?
    • Does that reflect in the types/numbers of systems that you support?
  • What types of testing, monitoring, and metrics do you use to ensure the health of the systems you support?
  • What have been some of the most interesting, challenging, or useful lessons that you have learned while building and maintaining the data platforms at LEGO?
  • How have the data systems at Lego evolved over recent years as new technologies and techniques have been developed?
  • How does the global nature of the LEGO business influence the design strategies and technology choices for your platform?
  • What are you most excited for in the coming year?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

TimescaleDB: The Timeseries Database Built For SQL And Scale - Episode 65

Summary

The past year has been an active one for the timeseries market. New products have been launched, more businesses have moved to streaming analytics, and the team at Timescale has been keeping busy. In this episode the TimescaleDB CEO Ajay Kulkarni and CTO Michael Freedman stop by to talk about their 1.0 release, how the use cases for timeseries data have proliferated, and how they are continuing to simplify the task of processing your time oriented events.

Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline, or want to test out the projects you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200Gbit private networking, scalable shared block storage, and a 40Gbit public network, you’ve got everything you need to run a fast, reliable, and bullet-proof data platform. If you need global distribution, they’ve got that covered too with world-wide datacenters including new ones in Toronto and Mumbai. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode today to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m welcoming Ajay Kulkarni and Mike Freedman back to talk about how TimescaleDB has grown and changed over the past year

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you refresh our memory about what TimescaleDB is?
  • How has the market for timeseries databases changed since we last spoke?
  • What has changed in the focus and features of the TimescaleDB project and company?
  • Toward the end of 2018 you launched the 1.0 release of Timescale. What were your criteria for establishing that milestone?
    • What were the most challenging aspects of reaching that goal?
  • In terms of timeseries workloads, what are some of the factors that differ across varying use cases?
    • How do those differences impact the ways in which Timescale is used by the end user, and built by your team?
  • What are some of the initial assumptions that you made while first launching Timescale that have held true, and which have been disproven?
  • How have the improvements and new features in the recent releases of PostgreSQL impacted the Timescale product?
    • Have you been able to leverage some of the native improvements to simplify your implementation?
    • Are there any use cases for Timescale that would have been previously impractical in vanilla Postgres that would now be reasonable without the help of Timescale?
  • What is in store for the future of the Timescale product and organization?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Advice On Scaling Your Data Pipeline Alongside Your Business with Christian Heinzmann - Episode 61

Summary

Every business needs a pipeline for their critical data, even if it is just pasting into a spreadsheet. As the organization grows and gains more customers, the requirements for that pipeline will change. In this episode Christian Heinzmann, Head of Data Warehousing at Grubhub, discusses the various requirements for data pipelines and how the overall system architecture evolves as more data is being processed. He also covers the changes in how the output of the pipelines are used, how that impacts the expectations for accuracy and availability, and some useful advice on build vs. buy for the components of a data platform.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline, or want to test out the projects you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200Gbit private networking, scalable shared block storage, and a 40Gbit public network, you’ve got everything you need to run a fast, reliable, and bullet-proof data platform. If you need global distribution, they’ve got that covered too with world-wide datacenters including new ones in Toronto and Mumbai. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode today to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Christian Heinzmann about how data pipelines evolve as your business grows

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by sharing your definition of a data pipeline?
    • At what point in the life of a project or organization should you start thinking about building a pipeline?
  • In the early stages when the scale of the data and business are still small, what are some of the design characteristics that you should be targeting for your pipeline?
    • What metrics/use cases should you be optimizing for at this point?
  • What are some of the indicators that you look for to signal that you are reaching the next order of magnitude in terms of scale?
    • How do the design requirements for a data pipeline change as you reach this stage?
    • What are some of the challenges and complexities that begin to present themselves as you build and run your pipeline at medium scale?
  • What are some of the changes that are necessary as you move to a large scale data pipeline?
  • At each level of scale it is important to minimize the impact of the ETL process on the source systems. What are some strategies that you have employed to avoid degrading the performance of the application systems?
  • In recent years there has been a shift to using data lakes as a staging ground before performing transformations. What are your thoughts on that approach?
  • When performing transformations there is a potential for discarding information or losing fidelity. How have you worked to reduce the impact of this effect?
  • Transformations of the source data can be brittle when the format or volume changes. How do you design the pipeline to be resilient to these types of changes?
  • What are your selection criteria when determining what workflow or ETL engines to use in your pipeline?
    • How has your preference of build vs buy changed at different scales of operation and as new/different projects become available?
  • What are some of the dead ends or edge cases that you have had to deal with in your current role at Grubhub?
  • What are some of the common mistakes or overlooked aspects of building a data pipeline that you have seen?
  • What are your plans for improving your current pipeline at Grubhub?
  • What are some references that you recommend for anyone who is designing a new data platform?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

How Upsolver Is Building A Data Lake Platform In The Cloud with Yoni Iny - Episode 56

Summary

A data lake can be a highly valuable resource, as long as it is well built and well managed. Unfortunately, that can be a complex and time-consuming effort, requiring specialized knowledge and diverting resources from your primary business. In this episode Yoni Iny, CTO of Upsolver, discusses the various components that are necessary for a successful data lake project, how the Upsolver platform is architected, and how modern data lakes can benefit your organization.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Yoni Iny about Upsolver, a data lake platform that lets developers integrate and analyze streaming data with ease

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by describing what Upsolver is and how it got started?
    • What are your goals for the platform?
  • There are a lot of opinions on both sides of the data lake argument. When is it the right choice for a data platform?
    • What are the shortcomings of a data lake architecture?
  • How is Upsolver architected?
    • How has that architecture changed over time?
    • How do you manage schema validation for incoming data?
    • What would you do differently if you were to start over today?
  • What are the biggest challenges at each of the major stages of the data lake?
  • What is the workflow for a user of Upsolver and how does it compare to a self-managed data lake?
  • When is Upsolver the wrong choice for an organization considering implementation of a data platform?
  • Is there a particular scale or level of data maturity for an organization at which they would be better served by moving management of their data lake in house?
  • What features or improvements do you have planned for the future of Upsolver?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Self Service Business Intelligence And Data Sharing Using Looker with Daniel Mintz - Episode 55

Summary

Business intelligence is a necessity for any organization that wants to be able to make informed decisions based on the data that they collect. Unfortunately, it is common for different portions of the business to build their reports with different assumptions, leading to conflicting views and poor choices. Looker is a modern tool for building and sharing reports that makes it easy to get everyone on the same page. In this episode Daniel Mintz explains how the product is architected, the features that make it easy for any business user to access and explore their reports, and how you can use it for your organization today.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Daniel Mintz about Looker, a a modern data platform that can serve the data needs of an entire company

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by describing what Looker is and the problem that it is aiming to solve?
    • How do you define business intelligence?
  • How is Looker unique from other approaches to business intelligence in the enterprise?
    • How does it compare to open source platforms for BI?
  • Can you describe the technical infrastructure that supports Looker?
  • Given that you are connecting to the customer’s data store, how do you ensure sufficient security?
  • For someone who is using Looker, what does their workflow look like?
    • How does that change for different user roles (e.g. data engineer vs sales management)
  • What are the scaling factors for Looker, both in terms of volume of data for reporting from, and for user concurrency?
  • What are the most challenging aspects of building a business intelligence tool and company in the modern data ecosystem?
    • What are the portions of the Looker architecture that you would do differently if you were to start over today?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unusual uses of Looker that you have seen?
  • What is in store for the future of Looker?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Using Notebooks As The Unifying Layer For Data Roles At Netflix with Matthew Seal - Episode 54

Summary

Jupyter notebooks have gained popularity among data scientists as an easy way to do exploratory analysis and build interactive reports. However, this can cause difficulties when trying to move the work of the data scientist into a more standard production environment, due to the translation efforts that are necessary. At Netflix they had the crazy idea that perhaps that last step isn’t necessary, and the production workflows can just run the notebooks directly. Matthew Seal is one of the primary engineers who has been tasked with building the tools and practices that allow the various data oriented roles to unify their work around notebooks. In this episode he explains the rationale for the effort, the challenges that it has posed, the development that has been done to make it work, and the benefits that it provides to the Netflix data platform teams.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Matthew Seal about the ways that Netflix is using Jupyter notebooks to bridge the gap between data roles

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by outlining the motivation for choosing Jupyter notebooks as the core interface for your data teams?
    • Where are you using notebooks and where are you not?
  • What is the technical infrastructure that you have built to suppport that design choice?
  • Which team was driving the effort?
    • Was it difficult to get buy in across teams?
  • How much shared code have you been able to consolidate or reuse across teams/roles?
  • Have you investigated the use of any of the other notebook platforms for similar workflows?
  • What are some of the notebook anti-patterns that you have encountered and what conventions or tooling have you established to discourage them?
  • What are some of the limitations of the notebook environment for the work that you are doing?
  • What have been some of the most challenging aspects of building production workflows on top of Jupyter notebooks?
  • What are some of the projects that are ongoing or planned for the future that you are most excited by?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Combining Transactional And Analytical Workloads On MemSQL with Nikita Shamgunov - Episode 51

Summary

One of the most complex aspects of managing data for analytical workloads is moving it from a transactional database into the data warehouse. What if you didn’t have to do that at all? MemSQL is a distributed database built to support concurrent use by transactional, application oriented, and analytical, high volume, workloads on the same hardware. In this episode the CEO of MemSQL describes how the company and database got started, how it is architected for scale and speed, and how it is being used in production. This was a deep dive on how to build a successful company around a powerful platform, and how that platform simplifies operations for enterprise grade data management.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • And the team at Metis Machine has shipped a proof-of-concept integration between the Skafos machine learning platform and the Tableau business intelligence tool, meaning that your BI team can now run the machine learning models custom built by your data science team. If you think that sounds awesome (and it is) then join the free webinar with Metis Machine on October 11th at 2 PM ET (11 AM PT). Metis Machine will walk through the architecture of the extension, demonstrate its capabilities in real time, and illustrate the use case for empowering your BI team to modify and run machine learning models directly from Tableau. Go to metismachine.com/webinars now to register.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Nikita Shamgunov about MemSQL, a newSQL database built for simultaneous transactional and analytic workloads

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you start by describing what MemSQL is and how the product and business first got started?
  • What are the typical use cases for customers running MemSQL?
  • What are the benefits of integrating the ingestion pipeline with the database engine?
    • What are some typical ways that the ingest capability is leveraged by customers?
  • How is MemSQL architected and how has the internal design evolved from when you first started working on it?
    • Where does it fall on the axes of the CAP theorem?

    • How much processing overhead is involved in the conversion from the column oriented data stored on disk to the row oriented data stored in memory?

    • Can you describe the lifecycle of a write transaction?
  • Can you discuss the techniques that are used in MemSQL to optimize for speed and overall system performance?

    • How do you mitigate the impact of network latency throughout the cluster during query planning and execution?
  • How much of the implementation of MemSQL is using custom built code vs. open source projects?

  • What are some of the common difficulties that your customers encounter when building on top of or migrating to MemSQL?
  • What have been some of the most challenging aspects of building and growing the technical and business implementation of MemSQL?
  • When is MemSQL the wrong choice for a data platform?
  • What do you have planned for the future of MemSQL?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building A Knowledge Graph From Public Data At Enigma With Chris Groskopf - Episode 50

Summary

There are countless sources of data that are publicly available for use. Unfortunately, combining those sources and making them useful in aggregate is a time consuming and challenging process. The team at Enigma builds a knowledge graph for use in your own data projects. In this episode Chris Groskopf explains the platform they have built to consume large varieties and volumes of public data for constructing a graph for serving to their customers. He discusses the challenges they are facing to scale the platform and engineering processes, as well as the workflow that they have established to enable testing of their ETL jobs. This is a great episode to listen to for ideas on how to organize a data engineering organization.

Preamble

  • Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management
  • When you’re ready to build your next pipeline you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to run a bullet-proof data platform. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • You work hard to make sure that your data is reliable and accurate, but can you say the same about the deployment of your machine learning models? The Skafos platform from Metis Machine was built to give your data scientists the end-to-end support that they need throughout the machine learning lifecycle. Skafos maximizes interoperability with your existing tools and platforms, and offers real-time insights and the ability to be up and running with cloud-based production scale infrastructure instantaneously. Request a demo at dataengineeringpodcast.com/metis-machine to learn more about how Metis Machine is operationalizing data science.
  • Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at dataengineeringpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Chris Groskopf about Enigma and how the are using public data sources to build a knowledge graph

Interview

  • Introduction
  • How did you get involved in the area of data management?
  • Can you give a brief overview of what Enigma has built and what the motivation was for starting the company?
    • How do you define the concept of a knowledge graph?
  • What are the processes involved in constructing a knowledge graph?
  • Can you describe the overall architecture of your data platform and the systems that you use for storing and serving your knowledge graph?
  • What are the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building the knowledge graph that you have encountered?
    • How do you manage the software lifecycle for your ETL code?
    • What kinds of unit, integration, or acceptance tests do you run to ensure that you don’t introduce regressions in your processing logic?
  • What are the current challenges that you are facing in building and scaling your data infrastructure?
    • How does the fact that your data sources are primarily public influence your pipeline design and what challenges does it pose?
    • What techniques are you using to manage accuracy and consistency in the data that you ingest?
  • Can you walk through the lifecycle of the data that you process from acquisition through to delivery to your customers?
  • What are the weak spots in your platform that you are planning to address in upcoming projects?
    • If you were to start from scratch today, what would you have done differently?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of your product that you have seen?
  • What is in store for the future of Enigma?

Contact Info

Parting Question

  • From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today?

Links

The intro and outro music is from The Hug by The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA